Yuzu Sorbet Recipe

The yuzu is the seville orange of the Far East. Only available in Winter, the fruit is mostly pith and pips, the taste sharp - and yet incredibly aromatic.  Yuzus were first grown in China, and then travelled to Japan and Korea, where it is know as 'yuza'. We have not yet managed to find the fruit in Europe, though yuzu juice does travel extremely well.

Yuzu juice is highly favoured in Japanese cuisine for the contrasting intense floral aroma and sour-lime flavour. Because of the high cost of yuzu, it is often used together with lime juice - as in the recipe below.


 For the yuzu and lime sorbet Serves: 6


For the crystallised lime peel

  • 1 lime
  • 1 tbsp caster sugar
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp water

To make the yuzu and lime sorbet

  1. Measure the cold water in a pan with the glucose, and separately mix together the sugar and the stabilizer.
  2. Pour the sugar/stabiliser mixture, stir and leave to hydrate for 15 minutes.
  3. Bring the mixture to the boil, stirring constantly with a hand whisk.
  4. Remove from the heat, pour in the yuzu and lime juices.
  5. Transfer to a plastic bowl, cover with clingfilm and allow to cool.
  6. Once cool transfer to an ice cream maker and churn for 45 minutes until frozen.
  7. Alternatively, pour the mixture into a strong plastic container and put in the freezer. After 1 hour 30 minutes it should have frozen round the edges. Take it out and beat vigorously with a fork, electric whisk or in a food processor until you have a uniformly textured mixture. Return it to the freezer and repeat at least twice more every 1 hour 30 minutes, then freeze for at least another hour.
© Speciality Cooking Supplies Limited 2019

To make the crystallised lime peel

  1. Use a sharp knife to cut the peel away from the rind. Slice into small squares, around 1cm by 1cm.
  2. Prepare a bowl of water filled with ice and cold water.
  3. Blanch the peel in a pan by pouring boiling water over it. Boil for 1 minute.
  4. Use a slotted spoon or small sieve to transfer the peel to the ice bath.
  5. Repeat 2 more times.
  6. Mix 1tbsp caster sugar and 2 tbsp water in a separate pan. Bring to the boil to create a simple syrup.
  7. Cook the peel in the syrup for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  8. Once cool, roll the pieces of lime in the granulated sugar.
© Speciality Cooking Supplies Limited 2019


9 comments

  • Many thanks Jessica, and for the link!

    Adeayo on

  • Yes the sorbet stabiliser is heat activated so I’d recommend mixing it in with the sugar first, then adding water/liquid to make a sugar syrup which can then be heated. You might like to take a look at this page too: http://www.souschef.co.uk/sorbet-stabiliser.html
    Best wishes

    Jessica Donnithorne on

  • hi.
    can anyone please tell me if the sorbet stabiliser is heat activated?
    i’m hoping to make some alcohol based sorbets using a batch freezer and none of the ingredients need heating up, except the making of the sugar syrup. so, for best results, do i add it to the sugar and water mixture? especially as the instructions ask that the temperature of the mix be increased.
    thanks

    Adeayo on

  • That does sound wonderful. Great tip – thank you. It also reminds me a little of this cocktail… http://www.souschef.co.uk/bureau-of-taste/yuzu-juice-mocktail/ Delicious!

    nicola on

  • Have you ever tried the combination of Yu Zu Sorbet and Sake? Served very chilled, it tastes like a charm.

    Niklas Beinghaus on

  • I can’t find sorbet stabilizer where I live in Singapore. I was told that I can use fruttosa but the merchant selling me isn’t sure it helps with stopping crystals from forming but just know it’s used as a powdered base for preparation of ice creams n sorbets.

    GC on

  • I’m afraid I am not familiar with Fruttosa.

    nicola on

  • I received a reply from you via email but it is not answering my question about fruttosa as a stabilizer.

    GC on

  • Help!
    Anyone have an OJ / white wine sorbet recipe?
    How much stabiliser would i need in an alcohol-based sorbet?
    thanks.

    Adeayo on

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